Category Archives: Sharon

Dirty Words for Hoof Practitioners – Thrush

There are several words for hoof conditions that Practitioners don’t like to tell horse owners that their horses have. Here is a review of some common terminology.

  • Thrush: Infection in the Frog
  • White Line Disease: Infection in the White Line (This is not a disease)
  • Seedy Toe: Split/Crack between the inner and outer wall
  • Abscess: Infection within the hoof capsule. There are two types of Hoof Abscess:
    Coronary Abscess ??? Exits out the Coronary Band??(Mild Discomfort)
    Subsolar Abscess ??? Exits out the sole of the hoof (Very Painful)
  • Laminitis: Swelling of the Laminae (Discomfort to Lameness)
  • Founder: Separation of the Laminae (Extremely Painful and Beyond Lameness)

Now that you have these definitions under your belt, lets look at what these mean to you and more importantly, your horse. Due to all the rain and muddy conditions, lets start with thrush.

horse frog no thrush

This frog has no thrush. There are no loose flaps for bacteria to grow.

Thrush is a bacterium that thrives in moist dark areas, therefore the frog is a perfect breading ground. It begins with just a tiny nick in your horses frog. Dirt / manure gets trapped in this little nick and begins to compost. If the horse is unable to stay out of muck and mire the infection soon spreads and deterioration of the frog begins.

Thrush can be as minor as slight discoloration of the frog with little to no smell or as serious as the frog literally being eaten away by the infection.

As the bacteria spreads, the frog becomes sensitive. In most cases the odor is noticed as soon as the hoof is picked up. When picking dirt out of the frog it may bleed. This is a serious case of thrush and needs to be treated immediately.

horse frog with thrush

This is a mild case of thrush. Notice how black and gooey the frog looks. When cleaning, the smell is quite pungent.
At this stage there is no discomfort when picking out the area.

Horses with extreme cases of thrush cannot bear weight on the infected caudal (back) hoof. In these circumstances the thrush has moved beyond the frog and into the Digital Cushion (DC). The DC is inside the hoof structure and once this happens, you have a long tough road to recovery, for now.  It isn’t only  the frog that needs to regenerate, but also the DC.

 

 

 

Suggestions to prevent thrush:

  • Be diligent and check your horses-feet on a regular basis.
  • Cut off ANY loose flaps that could trap dirt.
  • When you see even the smallest amounts of thrush treat it.
  • When cleaning my horses feet (whether they have signs of thrush or not), I spray their feet with Unpasteurized Apple Cider Vinegar with approximately 20 drops of Tea Tree Oil in it. This helps kill any bacteria that may be lurking in the hard to reach places of the frog.

Suggestions to rid your horse of thrush:

  • Minimal to Mild Thrush-Spray bottle with Apple Cider Vinegar and Tea Tree Oil daily.
  • Mild to Serious- Check out your local Agro/livestock Store for available products and treat accordingly. We use White Lightening in a spray bottle for most cases.
  • Extreme – Product from Agro/Livestock Store or ask your vet. We again use White Lightening and soak the hoof every two days and use the Apple Cider Vinegar mix in between, keeping the hoof either booted or wrapped to keep dirt out.

In any degree of thrush if there is a crevasse in the frog, we soak a cotton make-up pad with Tea Tree Oil and pack the frog, changing the pad every 2-3 days. This serves a dual purpose of preventing dirt from entering and providing an anti-bacterial agent (Tee Tree Oil) that kills the thrush.

Your Hoof Practitioner should always inform you if your horse has thrush to any degree. Taking care of the issue before it escalates is always the best course of action. Your horse will thank you for it!

Sharon Leney

Happy Hoof Inc.

Semi-Urban Trail Development on Vancouver Island

The Semi-Urban Trail

Or is it semi-rural? Whatever you call it, the Otter Point district near Sooke on Vancouver Island is one of the many areas in British Columbia where any notion of backcountry, is fast being swallowed up by development.

riding in william simmons park

William Simmons Memorial Community Park offers an easy 20 minute ride through forest to a meadow that offers grazing for horses and a picnic bench for riders. Be bear aware in all seasons.

For decades, locals have maintained trails through and around private acreages, crown land, forestry lands, and beaches. Increasingly, access to these informal trails is being cut off by residential subdivisions.

In the face of this challenge, equestrians in the area have realized that their best option is to join forces with hikers and cyclists to support the development of multi-use linear parks throughout the region. This is painstaking work that requires both a grand plan for the future and the patience to be satisfied with small gains as they come along. Sometimes it’s worth fighting for a piece as small as 1.4 hectares.

The Secret Park

Local riders all knew that you used to be able to follow a trail at the end of Eaglecrest Drive up to the forestry lands beyond. But blow-downs and washouts had over time made access impossible. Besides, the entrance was crazy-steep.

Half-hearted attempts to get the trail cleared again suddenly became quite focused in 2010 when the land behind it was slated for development. What would happen to the trail? A little research showed that in fact the 1.4 hectare area had been designated as park in an earlier subdivision. Ahah! A toehold to maintain public access. But how to go about it?

Fortunately, help was at hand in the Juan de Fuca Community Trails Society. Since 2005, this group of hikers, cyclists, and riders had been working with local government to identify and document historical trails and public rights-of-way in the region. The Trails Society readily jumped in with advice and contacts, and, as things progressed, manpower and tools.

Friends of Eaglecrest Park Society

Parks and trails in Otter Point come under the governance of the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area Parks and Recreation Commission of the Capital Regional District (JdF Parks). In 2010, JdF Parks was just starting up a stewardship program that would allow residents to participate in the development and maintenance of the community parks that are scattered throughout the area.

Riders and non-riders living near Eaglecrest Drive had previously formed the Friends of Eaglecrest Park Society (FEPS). This society was re-energized and applied to become park stewards. Because local residents showed an interest, Eaglecrest Park was allotted some funding.

Development and Maintenance

Our goal was to create an all-season trail through otherwise undeveloped forest a Natural Area Recreation Park. This JdF Parks designation is important because it means the park won’t ever be cleared for another use, such as a baseball diamond.

riding in eaglecrest

The Eaglecrest trail is a short, steep climb through coastal rainforest with a rest area at the top. There is a little side loop for variation. It???s especially popular with local riders as a leg-stretch after arena work. Be bear aware, even in winter.

Because we became park stewards, FEPS was fully involved when the trail was first cleared by JdF Parks in the summer of 2010. For example, our feedback resulted in the switch-back near the entrance being re-done to make it safer for horses. Since then, we have been responsible for maintenance. We have regular work parties to inspect the condition of the trail and do any tasks required, such as improving drainage or clipping back salal. We provide JdF Parks with quarterly reports that detail the condition of the trail and describe our work. We also comment on trail use, including photos, so that they know that the trail is being used by horses as well as walkers. JdF Parks is very supportive, and provides extra help and materials when required.

Rosemary Jorna and Howard Taylor

Rosemary Jorna from the JdF Community Trails Society and Howard Taylor from FEPS, clearing a drainage ditch on the Eaglecrest trail, December 2014. The two groups often work together on projects.

It’s only 1.4 hectares. What’s the point?

The point is that the Juan de Fuca Parks and Recreation Advisory Commission has, with community input, developed a vision for the area that involves linking together whatever land they can get to create a network of multi-use trails. Each time we secure a couple of hectares of land for equestrian use, it is another link in the network.

Becoming involved with this project also means we are consulted when new developments come along. For example, FEPS was invited to meet with the developers of the 220 hectares beyond the park to discuss the trail they were offering as an amenity. Now the developers know that a horse-friendly trail would be well-received in any proposal they make.

One Thing Leads to Another

As a direct result of the success of the Eaglecrest project, JdF Parks contacted the Sooke Saddle Club about the possibility of including horse facilities at a new park they were developing in Otter Point, William Simmons Memorial Community Park. The Community Parks program doesn’t have a large budget, and was there any way to get funding? And if so, what facilities would be desired?

william simmons park

The park has shared trails, but some picnic areas are off-limits to horses. This kind of planning keeps everybody happy.

With the help of BC Horse Council funding (Recreation and Industry Grant), the Saddle Club ensured that William Simmons Park in Otter Point has trailer parking, a horse and rider rest area, hitch rail, and manure bin. These are convenient for riders, but are also permanent structures that state clearly horses belong here.  Road crossings are a major concern for semi-urban trails. So, the Saddle Club ensured that there is a Horse Crossing sign on the road that connects the park to trails through a nearby subdivision. The subdivision trails are also horse friendly, thanks to club input and monitoring.

The Saddle Club regularly inspects and reports on the condition of the trail and facilities. Recently, William Simmons Park was expanded, and the club was contacted again for input on the expansion.

Building the Network

rest area on equine trail

The hitch rail and other amenities in the rest area were built to rugged park standards.

William Simmons, like Eaglecrest, is a small park, only 6.6 hectares, but it is has been identified by the Juan de Fuca Community Trails Society and JdF Parks as the hub of a trail network for the region. The next piece is close to being in place. JdF Parks has a permit from the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure to develop a 1.6 km trail along an unused right of way that leads from William Simmons to another area with park potential. We can’t wait to see hoof prints on that trail!

Tips for Semi-Urban Trail Development

  • Get there first. Park development is often done on a first-come, first-served basis. If trails are being actively used by horses, then horse facilities are more likely to be provided.
  • Make maps. Work with local riders to identify current or historical informal trails on public or private land that have the potential for development. Also consider roads–which ones could easily incorporate riding paths?
  • Understand the politics. Find out how, when, and where trail-development decisions are made in your area. Find policies you can support, and work from there.
  • Create a voice for yourselves. Form a legal society so that you have an official place at the table, when development is being discussed.
  • Think multi-use. Hikers, riders, and cyclists have some different needs, but many more common interests. Cooperate and educate so that horses are welcome on your trails.
  • Find money. Look for grants and other sources of funding that will help make your projects possible and desirable.
  • Geocache. You want your trails to be used. Geocaching is a great incentive to use the trail, and provides evidence of use.

destroyed geocache

There are three Amazing Backcountry caches in the area: William Simmons, Butler Trail ??and Eaglecrest.